Author Archives: Boz

Misinterpreting Emerson: A Meditation on Consistency, the Constitution, and American Exceptionalism

When I first started working as a disability examiner for Social Security, we had no desktop computers, just Wang terminals; nor could we communicate via email, just intraoffice messaging whose default was “reply all.” Hence, I established a wide reputation … Continue reading

Posted in Bill of Rights, First Amendment, free speech, gun rights, history, politics, Second Amendment | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wilmer and Friends . . . Old Friends

The following conversation occurred late on a summer afternoon about fifteen years ago at a house on the shores of Lake Gaston, North Carolina. The participants were a guileless pre-pubescent girl named Victoria and her two much older auditors, Vicki … Continue reading

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Waiting Room

Of the many words of Just(e) Words, some have become leitmotivs intertwining the preoccupations of my mind with the events in my life. In fact, I find comfort in the notion that body and soul are so firmly bound together … Continue reading

Posted in Advent, cancer, hope, language | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Fatty, Fatty, Two by Four

A fat child For the illumination of those who didn’t bear the sting of the taunt that inspired my title, let me quote: Fatty, fatty, two by four, Couldn’t get through the bathroom door, So she did it on the … Continue reading

Posted in Arizona, exercise, fat, fitness, memories, obesity | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

Everything Calm on the Occidental Battlefield: Or, Plagiarism 101

What follows is a literary analysis I received at the end of the spring semester in one of my English 112 classes. My first clue that something was amiss was the title in the first sentence–and the fact that it … Continue reading

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10,000 Steps (and Photos?)

Almost three months have passed since I last posted here–by far the longest dry spell since I started writing in 2016. Not accidentally, this hiatus coincides with my newly rediscovered passion for fitness. Last May, my family doctor told me … Continue reading

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“They Shall Not Grow Old”: See it if you can!

For the Fallen By Laurence Binyon With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children, England mourns for her dead across the sea. Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit, Fallen in the cause of the free. Solemn … Continue reading

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Fruition: 2018

As I began to ponder the year soon coming to a close, it seemed necessary and fitting that I end the longest hiatus of my blog-writing career with a brief narration of the project–now complete–that has consumed my life for … Continue reading

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The Mother of Beauty: World War I in Word, Image, and Song

Published below is the text of a talk I will give tomorrow to commemorate the Armistice centenary as part of a series of events entitled “FTCC Remembers World War I: 1914-1918.” “Death is the mother of beauty,” wrote Wallace Stevens, … Continue reading

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One Doomed Youth–and 17 Million More

From July to November 1917, Wilfred Edward Salter Owen was a shell-shocked second lieutenant in the Manchester Regiment, under the care of W. H. R. Rivers at Craiglockhart War Hospital. There, he became close friends with Siegfried Sassoon, who became … Continue reading

Posted in history, literature, poem, poetry, World War I | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments